Making Government’s Massive Programs Work: Now It’s the Law

Co-Author: Roger Kodat, Project Director, National Academy of Public Administration

In addition to managing ongoing programs, the federal government increasingly is called upon to undertake large, complex initiatives and to adapt and improve existing programs in a rapidly changing environment.

Actionable Cybersecurity Practices for the 21st Century: Perspectives from Experts

The IBM Center recently partnered with the National Institute for Standards and Technology (NIST) and George Washington University Center for Cyber and Homeland Security to convene a set of interactive discussions among Chief Information Security Officers (CISOs) and other security executives in government and industry.  The meeting highlighted challenges and opportunities for action.

Understanding Cognitive Counter-Fraud, Waste and Abuse

Greg Greben, Vice President and Client Group Leader, Federal Civilian & Healthcare Agencies, IBM Global Business Services, authored this article

Understanding Cognitive Counter-Fraud, Waste and Abuse (Part II)

Greg Greben, Vice President and Client Group Leader, Federal Civilian & Healthcare Agencies, IBM Global Business Services, authored this article.

 

 

Last week's blog defined fraud, waste, and abuse (FWA), described many successful FWA federal programs, and outlined some of the costs associated with FWA. This continuation will address government challenges; define cognitive counter-fraud, waste, abuse; and discuss next steps.

Making sense of the IT Modernization challenge

Guest bloggers: Mike Conger and Michael Preis, IBM Global Business Services.

Seven Drivers of Government Transformation: The Center Looks Ahead

In 2018, the IBM Center for The Business of Government marks its twentieth year of connecting research to practice in helping to improve government.  The IBM Center con­tinues to execute on its ultimate mission: to assist public sector executives and manag­ers in addressing real world problems with practical ideas and original thinking to improve government.

Leveraging Commercial Innovation to Drive Government Shared Services

Blog Co-Author: Jesse Samberg, Shared Services Fellow, IBM Center for The Business of Government.

How Can Government Best Integrate and Share Information, at Home and Abroad?

The IBM Center for the Business of Government hosted a recent Roundtable discussion with current and former government leaders and stakeholders about integrating and analyzing data within and across governments across the Atlantic to improve threat prediction and prevention. This initial discussion focused on how the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) information sharing enterprise can have greatest impact and interaction with partners. 

Sea, Land, Air, Space Superiority – Why are Near-Peer Adversaries able to Excel?

Guest Blogger: Townley Cozad, Associate Partner, Defense & Intelligence, IBM

 

Even as the United States remains the strongest, most capable military in the world, U.S. leadership in all domains is being challenged by “near-peer” competitors aggressively seeking to close the capability gap.  The military calls this “near-peer” (against someone who has similar weapons and abilities) warfare.

Announcing the Center’s Newest Research Report Topics

We are pleased to announce our latest round of awards for new reports on key public sector challenges, which respond to priorities identified in the Center's research agenda(for more detail on these priorities, see “Seven Drivers Transforming Government”). Our content is intended to stimulate and accelerate the production of practical research that benefits government leaders and managers.

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Executive Director
IBM Center for The Business of Government
600 14th Street, NW
Second Floor
Washington, DC 20005
United States
(202) 551-9310

Dan Chenok is Executive Director of the IBM Center for The Business of Government. He oversees all of the Center's activities in connecting research to practice to benefit government, and has written and spoken extensively around government technology, cybersecurity, privacy, regulation, budget, acquisition, and Presidential transitions. Mr. Chenok previously led consulting services for Public Sector Technology Strategy, working with IBM government, healthcare, and education clients.

Mr. Chenok serves in numerous industry leadership positions. He is a CIO SAGE with the Partnership for Public Service, Fellow of the National Academy of Public Administration, Chair of the Cybersecurity Subcommittee of the DHS Data Privacy and Integrity Advisory Committee, Member of the George Washington University Center for Cyber and Homeland Security Board of Directors, Member of the American University IT Executive Council, and Co-Chair of the Senior Executives Association Community of Change for Governance Innovation; previously, he served as Chair of the Industry Advisory Council (IAC) for the government-led American Council for Technology (ACT), Chair of the Federal Information Security and Privacy Advisory Board, and two-time Cybersecurity commission member with the Center for Strategic and International Studies. Mr. Chenok also generally advises public sector leaders on a wide range of management issues. Finally, Mr. Chenok serves as an Adjunct Associate Professor with the LBJ School of Public Affairs at the University of Texas in Austin, teaching at the school's Washington, DC Center. 

Before joining IBM, Mr. Chenok was a Senior Vice President for Civilian Operations with Pragmatics, and prior to that was a Vice President for Business Solutions and Offerings with SRA International.

As a career Government executive, Mr. Chenok served as Branch Chief for Information Policy and Technology with the Office of Management and Budget, where he led a staff with oversight of federal information and IT policy, including electronic government, computer security, privacy and IT budgeting. Prior to that, he served as Assistant Branch Chief and Desk Officer for Education, Labor, HHS, and related agencies in OMB's Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs. Mr. Chenok began his government service as an analyst with the Congressional Office of Technology Assessment, and left government service at the end of 2003.

In 2008, Mr. Chenok served on President Barack Obama’s transition team as the Government lead for the Technology, Innovation, and Government Reform group, and as a member of the OMB Agency Review Team.

Mr. Chenok has won numerous honors and awards, including a 2010 Federal 100 winner for his work on the presidential transition, and the 2016 Eagle Award for Industry Executive of the Year.

Mr. Chenok earned a BA from Columbia University and a Master of Public Policy degree from Harvard's Kennedy School of Government.